New! Subscribe to this blog via Kindle

If you hate reading things on computer screens (or dinky little smart phone displays), you might like to know that you can now subscribe to this blog, A Catholic Reader, via Kindle. If you have a Kindle, you can either click the hyperlink in the previous sentence to sign up on the Amazon web site, or select the "Shop the Kindle Store" menu option on your Kindle and then type in "a catholic reader" in the search bar. There is a small fee of 99 cents per month to have the blog delivered to your Kindle reader, but you can try it for 14 days at no charge. You'll get automatic updates each time a new article is posted. I have tried it, and find it much easier to read. The images download as well as the text, if you care about that sort of thing.

One nice thing about subscribing to blogs via Kindle is that if you press the center of your five-way button (on Kindles that have one), you get an article list with the title of each post (and image, if there is one), making it easy to navigate from one article to the next. Give it a try, and let me know how you like it!

Comments

RAnn said…
I'm a Catholic book blogger and run a weekly gathering known as Sunday Snippets--A Catholic Carnival. We are a group of Catholic bloggers who gather weekly to share posts with each other. This week's host post is at http://rannthisthat.blogspot.com/2012/10/sunday-snippets-catholic-carnival_13.html
Lisa Nicholas said…
Thanks for letting me know. I'll take a look!

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