New Literary Journal: The Lost Country

The Lost Country, cover, volume 1 number 1
This week, phone and internet outages combined with a raging head-cold  to keep me from getting much writing done (although I've got plenty of things on the hob!). Let me suggest, then, that you take a look at the online edition of a new literary journal, The Lost Country, produced by some young scholar/writers of my acquaintance, who call themselves The Exiles. You can read it online or download a PDF, but if you like what you see, you should really consider subscribing to the print edition, which is very handsomely produced. You can also learn more about The Exiles, who describe themselves as "a literary club in the venerable tradition of the Inklings of Oxford and the Fugitives of Vanderbilt University." If you'd like to encourage them in their work, they accept donations!
a literary club in the venerable tradition of the Inklings of Oxford and the Fugitives of Vanderbilt University
a literary club in the venerable tradition of the Inklings of Oxford and the Fugitives of Vanderbilt University
a literary club in the venerable tradition of the Inklings of Oxford and the Fugitives of Vanderbilt University
a literary club in the venerable tradition of the Inklings of Oxford and the Fugitives of Vanderbilt University

In the debut edition of The Lost Country, you'll find an essay that I wrote called "Charity, the Key to Reading The Story of the Grail," which is excerpted and adapted from my doctoral dissertation. But just to set the record straight, my dissertation was about memory as the hermeneutic key to reading Chrétien de Troyes’s Perceval (a.k.a. The Story of the Grail), and it was Barbara Sargent-Baur of Princeton University who literally wrote the book on charity in The Story of the Grail. Memory and charity, of course, work hand in hand, but if you want to know how that works in Chrétien’s romance, you’ll have to buy a copy of my dissertation (just ask for no. 3317643) or wait until I publish it as a book. Or just keep reading this blog, because I’m bound to mention it one of these days. Not today, I’m afraid, because I’m still waiting for the pseudoephedrine to kick in so that I can breathe well enough to oxygenate my brain properly.

What are you doing still reading this? Go! Go check out The Lost Country.

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