Featured Post

Fellowship of the Book: T. M. Doran's Toward the Gleam (Review)

Image
Christmas is upon us, and Peter Jackson's new Hobbit movie has recently premiered, which reminds me of a great book I've been meaning to recommend. Anyone looking for a Christmas gift for fans of Tolkien's tales of Middle Earth should take a look at T. M. Doran's novel, Toward the Gleam (from Ignatius Press , available in hardback, ereader, and audio editions; get the Kindle version from Amazon .) It is both an homage to Tolkien's Lord of the Rings and a gripping tale in its own right. The makers of the book's trailer definitely wanted to draw attention to the connection between Doran's novel and Tolkien's. The cover art design for the book should also remind readers of LOTR. Toward the Gleam 's cover was designed by John Herreid and executed by a wonderful Catholic artist, Daniel Mitsui . You can see that it incorporates some of the design elements from the well-known covers of the 1986 Houghton Mifflin edition (below), such as the r

Kindle freebie, Amazon reviews

download my book free
.Just a quick note today -- I'm running a freebie promotion on my little book on all the helpful uses of diatomaceous earth around the home . Saturday, 15 June through Sunday, 16 June, you can download the book for free!

Those who don't have a Kindle can purchase the paperback version, which is currently being offered at a 13% discount.

Anyone interested in having a "greener" home, using healthier products to get rid of bugs such as fleas, ants, even bedbugs, or just "getting back to nature" will enjoy this book. Think of it as my little gift to you. If you like your gift, please post an Amazon review saying what you like.

The Christus Experiment by Rod Bennett
If you'd like to know what I've been reading lately, you can take a look at my reviews on Amazon or on Goodreads. Among new works of fiction I've read lately, probably the most interesting book for readers of this blog is The Christus Experiment, by Rod Bennett, author of Four Witnesses: The Early Church in Her Own Words. The premise is fascinating -- what if you could go back in time, kidnap Jesus, and bring him into our own day? I got suckered in by the glowing praise by high-profile Catholics such as Mike Aquilina and Mark Shea, but I have to say that this "high concept" novel disappointed me. If you'd like to know why, read my Amazon review.

Right now, I'm reading mostly science fiction novels from the great writers of the '50s and '60s, some of whom I discussed recently on my science fiction blog. If you hop on over there, you can also read my latest post about the novel I'm writing and the series I'm planning. Catholic science fiction! Saints in outer space! What's not to like?

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Grace and Purification in Flannery O'Connor's “Revelation”

Reading and the Moral Imagination: Plato and truth in fiction

Mystery, thrills and suspense from contemporary Catholic writers

Rerum Novarum in context

Moral Imagination: Beauty, Truth, and Goodness

Found it on Kindle Blogs: Reading Clive Cussler

Fellowship of the Book: T. M. Doran's Toward the Gleam (Review)